…”effect of repeat injections of hyaluronic acid unclear. May not halt progression of OA nor delay knee replacement”…

Written by admin on December 29, 2012 – 11:02 am -

“Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint as well as bony overgrowth, which ultimately lead to pain and joint stiffness. Most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, and joints in the hands and spine. OA of the weight bearing joints (e.g. knee and hip) typically have the most clinical significance. The causes of OA are presumed to be related to mechanical and molecular events in the joint (http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/osteoarthritis.htm).

OA usually begins after the age of 40. OA affects 13.9% of adults aged 25 and older and 33.6% of those aged 65 and over (http://www.cdc.gov/arthritis/basics/osteoarthritis.htm). Among those affected, approximately one quarter of them are severely disabled. [3] Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of mobility disabilities such as difficulty walking or climbing up stairs. OA of the knee is one of five leading causes of disability among non-institutionalized adults. [4]

Knee OA is the most prevalent, followed by hip OA. Both knee and hip OA result in joint pain and stiffness which can ultimately interfere with function and restrict activities of daily living [5].

There is no cure for OA. In addition, there are currently no known therapies that can prevent progression of OA. Treatment of OA typically focuses on minimizing pain and swelling, reducing disability and improving quality of life.
Treatment typically starts with non-pharmacologic therapy approaches including exercise programs, weight loss, patient education and shoe insoles. [6] Non-pharmacologic approaches are typically tried before medications are started.

Pharmacologic treatment is typically the next step and focuses on relief of pain. Pharmacologic therapy typically includes acetominophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors and opiates. Each of these medications can be beneficial in some patients and each is associated with characteristic side effects. Given that the patient population is typically an older one, often with other comorbid conditions, the side effects associated with long term use of some of the OA medications can be particularly problematic.

Intra-articular glucocorticoid injections are another potential component of OA treatment….”

For the entire article please click below.

Hyaluronic Acid for Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee…


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