Dr. Mark Galland Interview with TWC

Written by admin on May 27, 2014 – 11:24 am -

From the baseball diamond to hitting the pavement to prepare for a marathon, spring and summer can be tough on our bodies. Dr. Mark Galland, an orthopaedic surgeon from Orthopedic Specialists of North Carolina, has details on the best way to avoid injury

Watch the interview HERE

Dr. Mark Galland is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon and adjunct Clinical Professor, specializing in sports medicine, practicing in Wake Forest and Raleigh. He serves as team physician and Orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, High-A Affiliate of the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball, as well as several area high schools and colleges. Dr. Galland can be reached at (919) 562-9410 or by visiting www.orthonc.com or www.drmarkgalland.com, or on twitter @drmarkgalland.


Posted in Injury Prevention, Joint Replacements, News Releases | No Comments »

Athletic Training: Expanding Horizons in Modern Healthcare

Written by admin on March 3, 2014 – 11:48 am -

Where does an athletic trainer work? You think you know the answer? Easy, right? In a college, high school, or with a professional sports team. As true now as it has ever been, but times are changing, and the reach of Athletic Training is at the forefront of that change. Although the origins of the profession are deeply rooted in athletics and in sporting events, their work environments now stretch far beyond those typical settings.
Though athletic trainers are now indispensable components in a variety of different organizations, it has only been in the past 10 years that they first began to appear in non-traditional settings: the military, motorsports, fire and police departments, and the performing arts. Perhaps most surprisingly, the U. S. military has fully embraced the athletic trainer as an integral member of their medical teams. Navy and marine bases now have Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Therapy (SMART) clinics and the Army has the Musculoskeletal Action Team (MAT) to serve their soldiers. These clinics/teams, staffed by athletic trainers and physical therapists, are being implemented at military bases around the world. Their presence has proven to decrease the number of emergency room and orthopaedic physician visits (which are often costly, unnecessary and delayed from time of injury) and provide their personnel the immediate, specialty musculoskeletal care that they need. Initiating care earlier (often immediately after injury) and lowering the cost of the care provided. The Army and Marine Corps also utilize athletic trainers during basic training to keep their trainees “in the game.” The addition of athletic trainers to basic training camps has resulted in a noticeable increase in the number of trainees graduating. Not traditionally considered the seat of innovative thought, the U. S. military has proven agile in this instance and our soldiers, sailors and marines are the beneficiaries. Athletic trainers have been the very soul of that innovation.
From humble origins but always true to their core mission: health and welfare of athletes, athletic training has become an indispensable partner for various and disparate organizations. An athletic trainer is an invaluable healthcare asset to any organization. Athletic Training—thinking outside the box: it’s not just for sports teams any longer!

Alyssa Rabert is a nationally Certified, state Licensed Athletic Trainer and post-graduate Resident in training at The Galland Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Athletic Training Residency– a 12 month immersional program allowing ATCs to maintain and hone clinical skills while developing those talents necessary to be effective in the clinical setting as an ATC/physician extender. Find out more at www.atcfellowship.com


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Dr. Mark Galland Discusses Youth Pitching, Use of the Curve Ball and Matt Harvey

Written by admin on August 27, 2013 – 8:36 pm -

Dr Mark Galland – Youth Pitching

ABOUT DR. MARK GALLAND:
Mark Galland, M.D. is an orthopaedic surgeon, sports medicine specialist and physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. He currently serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the advanced A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College Athletic Program, medical director of the Barton College athletic program, adjunct clinical professor at Marietta College and team physician and Orthopaedic consultant to several area high schools.


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Posted in Elbow, Injury Prevention, News Releases, Podcast | No Comments »

Dr. Mark Galland Speaks To News 14 About Injury Prevention For Student-Athletes

Written by admin on August 14, 2013 – 8:43 am -

Dr. Galland spoke with Marti Skold from News 14 on Friday to discuss how student athletes can prevent injury as they return to their fall sports. As athletes begin training in the hot summer sun, it is very important for athletes to understand safety precautions that will help ensure a safe practice. To view the segment, visit http://triangle.news14.com/content/news/in_depth/698264/in-depth–orthopedic-surgeon-dr–mark-galland .


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Posted in Around the office, Health and Fitness, Injury Prevention, News Releases, Sports Medicine | No Comments »

Alex V. Weighs in on the Importance of Sunglasses in Sports

Written by admin on July 30, 2013 – 5:25 pm -

For many of us, wearing the proper protective equipment for sports is a no brainer. Helmet? Check. Mouthguard? Check. Elbow pads? Double check. It only takes one errant kick during a soccer game before that bruise reminds you never to forget to wear your shinguards again. But how many times have you squinted your way through a softball match and thought the only consequence might be losing a ball in the sun? If it’s even once, research has shown your eyes may have been harmed by ultraviolet (UV) rays.

We know that UV exposure is dangerous for our skin, but many of us often neglect to protect our eyes from the sun. Did you know it is even possible to sunburn your eyes? It’s a condition known as photokeratitis–you may have heard of it referred to as ’snow blindness’ which is related to the temporary decrease in vision that comes from the bright sunlight reflecting off the snow. Research has shown that an accumulation of UV damage over time can lead to increased risk of certain health problems such as cataracts, macular degeneration, and even cancer. Some studies also suggest that people with blue eyes are at higher risk for incurring UV damage to the cornea and lens than those with brown eyes. While those that participate in work or leisure activities based on highly reflective surfaces such as pavement, water, and sand should be especially careful, everyone can benefit from sporting a pair of shades. Consistent, year-round use when spending time outdoors can go a long way towards safeguarding the health of your eyes.

Consider sunglasses as just another piece of protective equipment that you shouldn’t leave home without. You don’t need to shell out big bucks in order to find a good pair, either. Look for those that offer protection from both UVA and UVB rays and have a label denoting ANSI (American National Standards Institute) approval. With summer in full tilt, there’s no better time to make a habit of wearing a pair. Don’t forget to outfit the kids, too!

The Vision Council released a research report providing a more comprehensive look at this topic that can be found here.
For more information about picking out a good pair of sunglasses, including what lenses are best for driving and other activities, check out this page.

Alex Vitek is a nationally Certified, state Licensed Athletic Trainer and post-graduate Resident in training at The Galland Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Athletic Training Residency– a 12 month immersional program allowing ATCs to maintain and hone clinical skills while developing those talents necessary to be effective in the clinical setting as an ATC/physician extender. Find out more at www.atcfellowship.com. You can reach Alex at AVitek@orthonc.com


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Posted in Injury Prevention, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Dr. Galland Featured in American Council on Exercise Article

Written by admin on July 8, 2013 – 4:10 pm -

Dr. Mark Galland was recently featured in an article published by the American Council on Exercise, titled “Muscular Imbalances Increase Your Client’s Risk for Injury.” In the article, Galland provides insight on muscular imbalances, their causes and how exercise helps prevent them.

To read the full article, visit:

http://www.acefitness.org/prosourcearticle/3358/muscular-imbalances-increase-your-clients.


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Posted in Health and Fitness, Injury Prevention, Sports Medicine | No Comments »

What you eat and how you exercise can prevent foot and joint pain

Written by admin on June 18, 2013 – 5:44 pm -

Joint pain is the most common complaint for the patients visiting an orthopedic surgeon. Many common causes of pain can be managed with a few easy and inexpensive strategies. Here is some simple advice to help you maintain a healthy, pain-free lifestyle.

Do
•change your shoes when showing signs of wear
•obtain custom shoe inserts to correct flat-footedness or collapsed arches
•regularly engage in a low-impact, cardiovascular fitness regimen
•allow sufficient time to recover following a period of intense exercise

Don’t
•engage in excessive, high-impact exercise when you are in pain
•forget to stretch
•exercise at a higher intensity than you are used to
•eat too many highly-processed foods or beverages

Do

Do change your shoes when showing signs of wear:
A great deal of technology and research goes into the construction of today’s athletic footwear, and this has led to improved comfort and stability for active people. For best results, opt for a professional fitting to find the right shoe for your foot and for the activity in which you will engage. When your shoes show signs of wear, your feet and arches will not receive the cushioning and support that are necessary to prevent joint pain. Change your shoes frequently, especially when they are showing signs of wear.

Do obtain custom shoe inserts to correct flat-footedness or collapsed arches:
Shoe inserts redistribute weight and relieve pressure on sensitive areas of the feet, and can reduce the stress on the lower body, correct an improper gait, and compensate for structural abnormalities, which may also prevent or alleviate knee, hip, and lower back pain. Pick up some shoe inserts at your local store or speak with your physician about getting custom shoe inserts to help you correct flat-footedness or collapsed arches.

Do regularly engage in a low-impact, cardiovascular fitness regimen:
Joint stiffness and pain are often caused or exacerbated by inactivity. By keeping the muscles and joints active, you can lessen the incidence of pain. Regular exercise also strengthens the muscle groups surrounding the joints, providing support that can reduce the likelihood of injury.

Do allow sufficient time to recover following a period of intense exercise:
Rest is important following activity to enable the tissues comprising the muscles and joints to regenerate, and to allow any minor swelling to dissipate. Not resting properly between workouts may intensify any pain you may experience and contribute to further injury.

Don’t

Do not engage in excessive, high-impact exercise when you are in pain:
The basis of a conservative approach to pain treatment is rest. When pain occurs, suspend activity for a couple of days and consider over-the-counter, anti-inflammatory medication. Resume activity gradually and stop as soon as any pain returns.

Do not forget to stretch:
Muscles that have not been properly warmed up and stretched are much more prone to injury and pain from exertion. To be sure that you prevent injury, even if you are just going for a walk, make sure that you stretch and warm-up sufficiently before and after your activities.

Do not exercise at a higher intensity than you are used to:
It is not wise to begin from a state of relative inactivity to participating in an event such as a 5K run or an hours-long bike ride. The inflammation and pain that can result from such an immoderate activity can last several days and can lead to injury. It is important to train properly for such events.

Do not eat too many highly-processed foods or beverages:
A growing body of evidence suggests that processed wheat flours and sugars contribute to the incidence of musculoskeletal pain. The best diet for preventing joint pain is one that is balanced and includes sufficient protein, and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Summary

Always consult your physician if you have questions about preventing joint pain. Sore joints can have a significant negative effect on your life and prevent you from doing the things you love. Maintaining healthy joints is a tough task, but your physician can provide you with helpful advice that will keep your joints in great shape.


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Posted in Foot & Ankle, Health and Fitness, Injury Prevention | No Comments »

The 4th International Conference on Concussion in Sport Held in Zurich, November 2012

Written by admin on April 17, 2013 – 9:28 pm -

“This paper is a revision and update of the recommendations developed following the 1st (Vienna 2001), 2nd (Prague 2004) and 3rd (Zurich 2008) International Consensus Conferences on Concussion in Sport …

The new 2012 Zurich Consensus statement is designed to build on the principles outlined in the previous documents and to develop further conceptual understanding of this problem …

While agreement exists pertaining to principal messages conveyed within this document, the authors acknowledge that the science of concussion is evolving, and therefore management and return to play (RTP) decisions remain in the realm of clinical judgement on an individualised basis…

This consensus paper is broken into a number of sections

1. A summary of concussion and its management, with updates from the previous meetings;

2. Background information about the consensus meeting process;

3. A summary of the specific consensus questions discussed at this meeting;

4. The Consensus paper should be read in conjunction with the SCAT3 assessment tool, the Child SCAT3 and the CRT (designed for lay use).

Please read the following for more information/ details:
Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport – BJSM

“At a press conference held at the American Academy of Neurology’s (AAN’s) 2013 Annual Meeting, the release of new AAN guidelines for the evaluation and management of sports-related concussion (SRC) were announced. The recommendations update the 1997 AAN sports concussion practice parameter and were published online in Neurology on March 18, 2013.[1] The new guidelines attempt to address uncertainty and inconsistency in the management of concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) by addressing 4 clinical questions:

1. For athletes, what factors increase or decrease concussion risk?

2a. For athletes suspected of having sustained concussion, what diagnostic tools are useful in identifying those with concussion?

2b. For athletes suspected of having sustained concussion, what diagnostic tools are useful in identifying those at increased risk for severe or prolonged early impairments, neurologic catastrophe, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment?

3. For athletes with concussion, what clinical factors are useful in identifying those at increased risk for severe or prolonged early postconcussion impairments, neurologic catastrophe, recurrent concussions, or chronic neurobehavioral impairment?

4. For athletes with concussion, what interventions enhance recovery, reduce the risk for recurrent concussion, or diminish long-term sequelae?

The new AAN recommendations — divided into preparticipation counseling; assessment, diagnosis, and management of suspected concussion; and management of diagnosed concussion — were nicely summarized at the press event by lead authors Christopher C. Giza, MD, and Jeffrey S. Kutcher, MD. However, some areas of the guideline are open to interpretation, particularly when it comes to deciding when it is acceptable to allow an athlete with a suspected concussion to return to play. The following summary serves as a guide to the new report, highlighting the major recommendations and providing additional clarification based on comments from Drs. Giza and Kutcher…”

Please read the following for more information/ details:
New Concussion Guidelines – An Analysis


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Dr. Mark Galland Discusses Injury Prevention Baseball For Amateur Athletes

Written by admin on February 21, 2013 – 8:08 am -

Dr. Mark Galland has announced the release of a podcast discussing prevention of common youth baseball injuries. In the podcast, Galland provides his expert opinion on some of the most common injuries associated with baseball: from little leaguer’s elbow to torn labrums and everything in between, and gives advice to parents, coaches and athletes on safety techniques for injury prevention.

“To prevent injury when playing baseball as a young athlete, the most important thing is to resist the temptation to achieve short term success at the expense of the long term goals of the athlete,” said Galland. “Too often I see that in the pressure to win we sacrifice the athlete, the baseball player or the pitcher that this child could be when he or she reach collegiate or professional levels.”

To listen to the podcast, click here: Injury Prevention In Youth Baseball


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Health Care in High School Athletics

Written by admin on February 15, 2013 – 2:02 pm -

Within high school athletics there is an inherent risk for injury. On some days parents may be present, but on many occasions coaches are tasked with injury management and coaching simultaneously. To relieve some of the stress of this dual responsibility, and ensure proper medical care for high school athletes many schools employee Certified Athletic Trainers.

Certified Athletic Trainers are not to be confused with strength and conditioning coaches, or personal trainers, but are health care professionals. While working under the direction of a physician they are trained in the prevention, diagnosis, immediate care, and rehabilitation of many injuries and medical conditions.

Certified Athletic Trainers also may work in industrial settings, physician’s offices, physical therapy centers, hospitals, colleges/ universities, professional sports, performing arts, wellness centers/ gyms, the military, or other public service organizations such as fire/ police departments.

So whether it is a fracture, a sprain, tendonitis, muscle cramps/ spasms, a contusion, or even asthma, diabetes, or heat illness (etc), “Every Body Needs An Athletic Trainer”.

Mary Sult is a certified and licensed (NC) athletic trainer at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC). Mary regularly provides outreach services to Bunn High School (Bunn, NC). OSNC’s Sports Medicine staff also works with other schools and sports organizations in Franklin, Granville, Wake, and Vance counties. For more information please visit www.orthonc.com.


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Posted in Around the office, Injury Prevention, Sports Medicine | No Comments »