Dr. Mark Galland Speaks To News 14 About Injury Prevention For Student-Athletes

Written by admin on August 14, 2013 – 8:43 am -

Dr. Galland spoke with Marti Skold from News 14 on Friday to discuss how student athletes can prevent injury as they return to their fall sports. As athletes begin training in the hot summer sun, it is very important for athletes to understand safety precautions that will help ensure a safe practice. To view the segment, visit http://triangle.news14.com/content/news/in_depth/698264/in-depth–orthopedic-surgeon-dr–mark-galland .


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Dr. Mark Galland To Discuss Injury Prevention And Treatment On WRAL News’ Rex On Call Segment

Written by admin on June 19, 2013 – 9:28 am -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Dr. Mark Galland, orthopaedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC) (http://www.orthonc.com/galland.html), has announced that he will appear on WRAL News’ Rex On Call segment on Monday, June 17 at 1:00 p.m.

The Rex On Call segment is a monthly half-hour program airing and streaming live the third Monday of every month on WRAL-TV and WRAL.COM, and features Rex Health Care physicians who answer questions from the general public. On Monday, Galland will discuss orthopaedic injury prevention and treatment for people of all ages. For more information or to submit a question for Galland, visit http://www.wral.com/rex-on-call/10230666/?navkeyword=rex+on+call.

QUOTES:
“Whether on the course, court, field or back yard, you should not let an injury slow you down,” said Galland. “I am excited to share my expertise and knowledge with the program’s viewers and to answer any questions that they have.”

NEW MEDIA:
Dr. Mark Galland Blog

http://drmarkgalland.com

Dr. Mark Galland YouTube Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/DrMarkGalland

ABOUT DR. MARK GALLAND:
Dr. Mark Galland is an orthopaedic surgeon, sports medicine specialist and physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. Galland received his medical degree from Tulane University’s School of Medicine and completed his residency in the university’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He began his career in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine while serving in the United States Navy at a naval hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. There, he served as chief of orthopaedic surgery and was the recipient of numerous awards for both leadership and excellence in treating injuries common to sailors and marines. Since beginning with Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina, Galland has continued to treat injured athletes. He currently serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the High-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team, and as medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College athletic program. He also serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to several local high schools, as well as on the board of directors for the Trentini Foundation, a nonprofit scholarship organization. For more information, visit http://www.orthonc.com or http://drmarkgalland.com.

Jordan Smith
MMI Public Relations
(919) 233-6600
jordan@mmipublicrelations.com

http://www.twitter.com/MMIPR

http://www.mmipublicrelations.com

(end)


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Dr. Mark Galland Named Adjunct Clinical Professor at Marietta College

Written by admin on May 14, 2013 – 7:42 pm -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Dr. Mark Galland, a physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC) (www.orthonc.com), has been appointed as an adjunct clinical professor at Marietta College. In this position, Galland will be responsible for clinical instruction in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine for the school and teaching their students at OSNC’s state-of-the-art orthopaedic sports medicine facility.

Marietta College is a private, coeducational, nonsectarian, undergraduate, residential, contemporary liberal arts school, which was founded in 1835. Located in Marietta, Ohio, the school boasts a student population of just more than 1,400 students. The Marietta College athletic program consists of 18 men’s and women’s teams including baseball, basketball, football, crew, cross country, soccer, softball, tennis, track, and volleyball, with nearly 400 student athletes.

Since joining Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina, Galland has focused on treating injured athletes. In addition to his role as adjunct clinical professor at Marietta College, he serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the advanced A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, as medical director of the Barton College athletic program, and as medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College athletic program. He also serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to several local high schools.

QUOTES:

“I am honored to be named adjunct clinical professor at Marietta College,” said Galland. “I am looking forward to working with the students and athletes at the school, helping them begin their path to careers within orthopaedics and sports medicine.”

ABOUT DR. MARK GALLAND:

Dr. Mark Galland is an orthopaedic surgeon, sports medicine specialist and physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. Galland received his medical degree from Tulane University’s School of Medicine and completed his residency in the university’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He began his career in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine while serving in the United States Navy at a naval hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. There, he served as chief of orthopaedic surgery and was the recipient of numerous awards for both leadership and excellence in treating injuries common to sailors and marines. Since beginning with Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina, Galland has continued to treat injured athletes. He currently serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the advanced A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, as medical director of the Barton College athletic program, and as medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College athletic program. He also serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to several local high schools.


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Dr. Mark Galland Named Top Orthopaedic Surgeon In North Carolina By HealthTap

Written by admin on April 25, 2013 – 11:54 am -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Dr. Mark Galland, a physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC) (http://www.orthonc.com/galland.html), has been named the top Orthopaedic Surgeon in North Carolina by HealthTap, an online interactive health network. The award represents the highest recognition for orthopaedic surgeons in the network.

QUOTES:
“I am honored to be recognized as the Top Orthopedic Surgeon in the great state of North Carolina. It is even more special to know that my contributions, which I have never considered extraordinary, are recognized as noteworthy and special by my patients, their families and friends,” said Galland. “I truly enjoy serving my wonderful patients, and if anything I do can be considered special or worthy of praise, it is only because my patients are so. This award is a recognition and reflection of them.”

NEW MEDIA:
Dr. Mark Galland Blog

http://drmarkgalland.com

Dr. Mark Galland YouTube Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/DrMarkGalland

ABOUT DR. MARK GALLAND:
Dr. Mark Galland is an orthopaedic surgeon, sports medicine specialist and physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. Galland received his medical degree from Tulane University’s School of Medicine and completed his residency in the university’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He began his career in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine while serving in the United States Navy at a naval hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. There, he served as chief of orthopaedic surgery and was the recipient of numerous awards for both leadership and excellence in treating injuries common to sailors and marines. Since beginning with Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina, Galland has continued to treat injured athletes. He currently serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the High-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team, and as medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College athletic program. He also serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to several local high schools, as well as on the board of directors for the Trentini Foundation, a nonprofit scholarship organization. For more information, visit http://www.orthonc.com or http://drmarkgalland.com.

Jordan Smith
MMI Public Relations
(919) 233-6600
jordan@mmipublicrelations.com

http://twitter.com/mmipr

http://www.mmipublicrelations.com

(end)


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Athletic Trainers on the Sidelines & in the Clinic/ Office…

Written by admin on March 6, 2013 – 4:00 pm -

Traditionally physician’s offices have been staffed by receptionists, medical assistants, nurses, physician assistants, x-ray technicians, and maybe even an intern or student. However, in recent years, athletic trainers (AT) have become important additions to many clinics, especially in orthopedic practices.

Athletic trainers have been recognized as allied healthcare professionals, by the American Medical Association, since 1990 (AMA, p. 1). An entry-level position within the profession requires a bachelor’s degree from an accredited academic program, a passing score on a three part (national) exam administered by the Board of Certification TM, state licensure or certification (required by 48 states within the U.S), and adherence to professional standards and a code of ethics. Once certified, an AT must also complete continuing education programs, and maintain CPR/ AED credentialing (Rogers).

The traditional role of an AT on the sidelines and within an athletic program, has expanded to the medical clinic as a physician extender. For some, formal post-graduate work may be completed in the form of a residency or fellowship, but even without such additional training, most ATs are well-prepared to function as physician extenders in orthopaedics. This ability is borne from the undergraduate curriculum which is an intense focus on prevention, diagnosis, and intervention techniques for emergency, acute, and chronic musculoskeletal maladies.

As a physician extender, athletic trainers are often responsible for recording patient histories, performing physical assessments, and presenting the findings to the physician. Additional duties include preparing injections, teaching home exercise/ rehabilitation programs, applying/ removing casts, fitting crutches/ braces, removing sutures/ staples, completing therapy/ lab/ medication orders, and answering patient questions about insurance claims, disability forms, injuries, treatment options, and procedures. With additional training, an AT may even administer patient injections and assist the surgeon in the operating room.

In 2009, Orthopedics Today reported that clinics utilizing athletic trainers, as physician extenders, “saw an 18% average increase in productivity,” without any apparent deterioration in quality of care. Recent literature suggests there is “no difference in the patient’s perception of care comparing an orthopedic resident and athletic trainer” (Pecha), and in fact, “trends are a little bit higher for the athletic trainer in patient satisfaction scores” (Pecha). Modern medicine, by its very nature is characterized by unprecedented uncertainty and volatility. There is little doubt that Athletic trainers are well-positioned to provide much needed support to their supervising physicians and to their patients.

Caitlin Davis, LAT, ATC is a post graduate fellow at GOSM. For more information, visit us at www.atcfellowship.com

Mary Sult (LAT, ATC) is a certified and licensed (NC) athletic trainer at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. Mary regularly provides outreach services to Bunn High School (Bunn, NC). OSNC’s Sports Medicine staff also works with other schools and sports organizations in Franklin, Granville, Wake, and Vance counties. For more information please visit www.orthonc.com.

References

American Medical Association. Therapy and Rehabilitation. Retrieved from

https://www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/40/ah03-athletic-trainer.pdf

Pecha, Forrest (2013, January). The Growing Role of Athletic Trainers in Orthopaedics. Retrieved from http://wwworthopreneurpub.com/component/content/article/332-the-growing-role-of-athletic-trainers-in-orhopaedics?…

Rogers, C. (2008, October). Physician extenders: Pa’s, np’s, and…athletic trainers?. Retrieved from http://www.aaos.org/news/aaosnow/oct08/managing4.asp

Today, O. (2009, July). Athletic trainers can move from the playing field into the office as physician extenders. Retrieved from http://www.healio.com/orthopedics/business-of-orthopedics/news/print/orthopedics-today/{8CC880B5-E523-4092-A54B-009EBB665D38}/Athletic-trainers-can-move-from-the-playing-field-into-the-office-asphysician-extenders


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Health Care in High School Athletics

Written by admin on February 15, 2013 – 2:02 pm -

Within high school athletics there is an inherent risk for injury. On some days parents may be present, but on many occasions coaches are tasked with injury management and coaching simultaneously. To relieve some of the stress of this dual responsibility, and ensure proper medical care for high school athletes many schools employee Certified Athletic Trainers.

Certified Athletic Trainers are not to be confused with strength and conditioning coaches, or personal trainers, but are health care professionals. While working under the direction of a physician they are trained in the prevention, diagnosis, immediate care, and rehabilitation of many injuries and medical conditions.

Certified Athletic Trainers also may work in industrial settings, physician’s offices, physical therapy centers, hospitals, colleges/ universities, professional sports, performing arts, wellness centers/ gyms, the military, or other public service organizations such as fire/ police departments.

So whether it is a fracture, a sprain, tendonitis, muscle cramps/ spasms, a contusion, or even asthma, diabetes, or heat illness (etc), “Every Body Needs An Athletic Trainer”.

Mary Sult is a certified and licensed (NC) athletic trainer at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC). Mary regularly provides outreach services to Bunn High School (Bunn, NC). OSNC’s Sports Medicine staff also works with other schools and sports organizations in Franklin, Granville, Wake, and Vance counties. For more information please visit www.orthonc.com.


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“Athletic trainers are valuable health care professionals.”

Written by admin on January 18, 2013 – 12:56 pm -

Call it what you do – January 18, 2013

“Athletic trainers have fought for years to be recognized and have the approriate regulations in place to protect the public. Hard work has gone into making sure that it accurately reflects what we do for the public.

Let’s remember and remind people that we do athletic training. Within that is a number of things. We do injury prevention, diagnosis, injury management and treatment, rehabilitation, administration and professional development. What do we not do?

We do not do medicine. We work under a physician and we are in the sports medicine field. We are not board certified. We ARE certified by the Board of Certification. We are not performing physical therapy. We are very skilled at performing rehabilitation. We are not water boys/girls. We do promote the benefits of hydration and other ways to prevent heat illness. We are not equipment managers, but we are skilled at fitting equipment properly and making sure that appropriate checks are in place to ensure the safety of athletes. We do not coach or do personal training, but work with coaches and strength coaches to protect athletes and optimize a person’s plan. We are not the “trainer.” The appropriate title, and the one that you can use, is athletic trainer.

Be proud of what you do and be accurate in how you explain it. Do not let someone else define your profession. Define it for them. The law is there to protect what we do. Know your practice act. Read it. If you don’t understand it then ask someone to explain it. Don’t practice with an idea of what you think is your practice act. Know it. If you travel to another state then you need to know that practice act. Can you practice there? These are important things that many ATs neglect to pay attention to and it gets them in trouble. Know your practice act.

Athletic trainers are valuable health care professionals. We have a specific and important skill set. Your skills are unmatched in the health care field. This is why we are sought after professionals. People want our skill set. Do not let others try to minimize your impact. Do not let others define what athletic training is. Do not let yourself improperly defining what you do. You are an athletic trainer.”

(http://wantzatc.wordpress.com/2013/01/18/call-it-what-you-do/)


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Graston Technique®: Decrease Pain and Improve Function

Written by admin on December 3, 2012 – 11:24 am -

Graston Technique® is an advanced form of soft tissue mobilization that utilizes stainless steel instruments to both detect and release scar tissue, adhesions, and fascial restrictions that occur in the body due to trauma or overuse. Originally developed in the 1990s, the Graston Technique® has become a tool for a wide variety of clinical and institutional settings including college and professional athletics.

During the healing process, our body attempts to repair damaged areas by creating scar tissue. Over time, this fibrous scar tissue builds up and can ultimately lead to pain and dysfunction because this replacement tissue is not as strong or flexible as healthy tissues. The Graston Technique® is designed to detect the build up of scar tissue, or adhesions. The instruments allow both the clinician and patient to find the areas of restriction and essentially “break up” those restrictive tissues. Most patients will receive a positive outcome within two to three treatments.

The Graston Technique® has been effective in a wide variety of conditions including but not limited to carpal tunnel syndrome, medial and lateral epicondylitis, IT band syndrome, back pain, muscle strains, and de Quervain’s syndrome. Most patients will feel better within two to three treatment sessions. A typical treatment session will consist of the following:

1. Warm-up

2. Graston Technique® Instrument-assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization

3. Stretching exercises

4. Strengthening exercises

5. Cryotherapy (cold pack)

The Graston Technique® is a manipulative treatment that utilizes significant force and pressure applied to the soft tissues, and as a result, possible side effects are likely to occur. Bruising is fairly common as the treatments will increase blood flow to the area. Soreness is common and develops within 24-72 hours after the treatment. The stretching exercises prescribed by the clinician will help decrease this soreness in the days after treatment. It is very important for the patient to maintain an adequate water intake. Appropriate hydration is essential in order to promote proper healing.

It is important to note that the Graston Technique® is just one part of the rehabilitation and treatment process. Successful outcomes will not be achieved with the instruments alone. Patient compliance with the necessary strengthening and stretching exercises is essential for positive outcomes.

Matt Rongstad is an Certified Athletic Trainer, Licensed in the state of NC. Matt is currently training in the GOSM Fellowship.

Dr. Galland is a Board Certified Orthopaedic Surgeon specializing in sports medicine practicing in Raleigh, NC. He serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, Cleveland Indians Single-A affiliate as well as many other local high schools and colleges. twitter@drmarkgalland.com.


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Dr. Mark Galland Named Medical Director Of Barton College Athletic Training Education Program

Written by admin on October 16, 2012 – 5:43 pm -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Dr. Mark Galland, a physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (www.orthonc.com/galland.html), has been named medical director of the Barton College Athletic Training Education Program, a Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) accredited program. As medical director, Galland serves as a resource to the program’s students and faculty for questions, topics, lectures and courses related to musculoskeletal medicine. By partnering with Barton College, Galland’s wealth of knowledge and experience in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine will be available to the program’s aspiring athletic trainers and future health care providers.

Barton College is a private liberal arts college in Wilson, N.C., with a student population of approximately 1,130. Its athletic training education program is a four-year curriculum and is nationally accredited by CAATE. Accredited programs prepare students with an interest in sports medicine to work in the growing allied health profession of athletic training, which focuses on prevention, emergency care, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and conditions in physically active persons (not just athletes). Graduates of Barton’s program are qualified to sit for the national certification exam and must pass before being able to practice as an ATC (certified athletic trainer). You can find athletic trainers working on the sidelines of high school, college, recreational and professional sporting events, as well as teaching at all levels, researching, and working in the military, performing arts, industrial settings, hospitals, therapy clinics and doctors’ offices.

The Barton College Athletic Education Training Program has two components, a didactic portion, which is classroom-based, and a clinical education portion. The laboratory classes allow for hands-on practice of the theories learned in lecture classes where students utilize cognitive, psychomotor skill recognition. Faculty and staff ATCs serve as Approved Clinical Instructors (ACI’s) and supervise students during rotations. Students have the opportunity to work on clinical skills with an ACI during their clinical experience and are involved in the daily operation of athletic training in various settings during the field experience portion of their clinical rotations.

For more information, visit http://www.barton.edu/academics/ATEP/.

“I am honored to be named medical director of Barton College’s Athletic Training Education Program,” said Galland. “Students enrolled in the program have a strong passion for athletic training and are eager to learn how to be successful in the field. I am excited to share my expertise in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine with the Barton College students.”


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Dr. Mark Galland Treats Cincinnati Reds Prospects In Dominican Republic

Written by admin on March 29, 2012 – 7:51 am -

RALEIGH, N.C. – Dr. Mark Galland, a physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina (OSNC) (http://www.orthonc.com/galland.html), completed a weekend of examinations and treatment Jan.14-15 with 43 Cincinnati Reds Major League Baseball team prospects in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Galland addressed the health status of the prospects, ranging from ages 16 to 24, and provided treatment recommendations regarding the players’ current injuries.

Galland regularly works with baseball pitchers and position players at all levels of the game. He serves as orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, High-A Affiliate of the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team and to several area college and high school athletic programs, treating youth and amateur players around the Triangle.

The Dominican Republic has grown a reputation for producing top-flight baseball talent to the Major Leagues. According to MLB.com, 28 of the 30 Major League baseball teams currently run academies in the country.

QUOTES:

“The Reds organization has a terrific group of young athletes in the Dominican Republic,” Galland said. “These prospects stand to make great contributions to the parent club and farm system, and I am very honored to be entrusted with their care and well-being. I look forward to watching them develop.”

NEW MEDIA CONTENT:

Dr. Mark Galland Blog

http://drmarkgalland.com

Dr. Mark Galland YouTube Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/DrMarkGalland

ABOUT DR. MARK GALLAND:

Dr. Mark Galland is an orthopaedic surgeon, sports medicine specialist and physician at Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina. Galland received his medical degree from Tulane University’s School of Medicine and completed his residency in the university’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. He began his career in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine while serving in the United States Navy at a naval hospital at Camp Lejeune, N.C. There, he served as chief of orthopaedic surgery and was the recipient of numerous awards for both leadership and excellence in treating injuries common to sailors and marines. Since beginning with Orthopaedic Specialists of North Carolina, Galland has continued to treat injured athletes. He currently serves as a team physician and orthopaedic consultant to the Carolina Mudcats, the High-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians Major League Baseball team, and as medical director and orthopaedic consultant to the Louisburg College athletic program. He also serves as the team physician and orthopaedic consultant to several local high schools, as well as on the board of directors for the Trentini Foundation, a nonprofit scholarship organization. For more information, visit http://www.orthonc.com or http://drmarkgalland.com.


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